WBCP
Wayne Bat Conservation Project

By Victor Alfieri, Project Founder
wbcp@woodlotfarms.com


Mission Statement

Conducting and supporting science-based bat conservation efforts. Working with the community, combining research, education and direct conservation to ensure bats will
continue helping us maintain healthy environments long
into the future.


Next Project Presentation
A presentation for this project will be held by project founder Victor Alfieri on
Saturday October 19th 2013
starting at 10:30am -12pm.  Presentation will cover our local bats, the harsh effects of pesticides, bat project how and why and ending with Q & A.  Open to all.  Please bring a friend. Location  Main Library, 461 Valley Road, Wayne New Jersey. 
Any Questions: wbcp@woodlotfarms.com

Sustainable Wayne
NEEDS YOUR HELP!
Bat conservation is a green project and counts towards
our local efforts to get Wayne NJ certified points
for "Sustainable Jersey" and will enable our town
to
apply for state grants that will further our local health
and sustainable efforts.


If you, your school, or organization would be interested
in donating time or
money to support this project
please contact: Project founder
, Victor Alfieri
E-mail @ editor@woodlotfarms.com
or call 201-220-4862



www.batconservation.org

Why Should We Protect The Bats?
Bats are essential to the health of our natural world. They help control pests and are vital pollinators and seed-dispersers for countless plants. Yet these wonderfully diverse and beneficial creatures are among the least studied and most misunderstood of animals.


Centuries of myths and misinformation still generate needless fears and threaten bats and their habitats around the world. Bat populations are declining almost everywhere. Losing bats would have devastating consequences for natural ecosystems and human economies. Knowledge is the key.

Bats are primary predators of night-flying insects, including many of the most damaging agricultural pests and others that bedevil the rest of us. Bats hunt insects, and have very
healthy appetites.

A single brown bat can eat up to 1,000 mosquito-sized insects in a single hour, while a pregnant or lactating female bat typically eats the equivalent of her entire body weight in insects each night.

10 Bat's = 10,000 mosquito-sized insects in a single hour.
50 Bat's = 50,000 mosquito-sized insects in a single hour.
100 Bat's = 100,000 mosquito-sized insects in a single hour.
 
There are more than 1,200 species of bats. They range from the world's smallest mammal, the tiny bumblebee bat that weighs less than a penny to giant flying foxes with six-foot wingspans. Bats have lived in almost every habitat on Earth since the age of the dinosaurs.

The most common bats found in the northeast US and Wayne NJ are the common
Little Brown Bat and Big Brown Bat.
Flying insect killers with 52.5 million years of experience.

Things you can do at home to protect our local bat populations: U.S. Fish & Wildlife

Section 9.10
Click to read "Elephant In The Room" Section 9.10
The harsh realities of pesticides and why this project is so important.

In compliance with Section 9.10 of the NJ Pesticide Code from May 2nd to October 28th Wayne Township, NJ and most towns spray insecticides to control the adult mosquito population.

Wayne NJ currently has 2 different mosquito spraying programs. The first program is the Passaic County Mosquito Control and they use 12 different types of pesticides for insect control. Most if not all counties have mosquito control programs. Chick To Read Full Report

Wayne is a town with a more serious insect problem and also has their own mosquito control spraying program.
The residents are notified before hand of the time and date insect spraying will occur. Then a county or town worker drives around in a truck, generally at night, with ULV equipment mounted on it and sprays parts of town.

The county and Wayne NJ spray in a coordinated tandem not to overlap spraying areas. The county town spraying programs are regulated by the state.

Spraying pesticides is not the long term answer. We need to find a better way.


Diseases Linked To Pesticides
food allergies, eczema, asthma, autism, learning disabilities, birth defects, reproductive
dysfunction, diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, and many types of cancer.

Pesticides continue to cause the decline of bee population in the U.S
EPA - Pesticides and Food: Health Problems Pesticides May Pose
National Cancer Institute - Progress Report
Pesticides and Cancer.
Pesticide chemicals linked to food allergies
Pesticides, Chlorinated Water May Lead to Food Allergies
Pesticides in Tap Water Linked to Food Allergies
Food Allergies Linked to Pesticides
Eczema cured by cutting out pesticides
eczema caused by pesticides in East Germany
Asthma, Children and Pesticides
Studies Link Range of Major Diseases to Pesticides, New Database Launched
Wide Range of Diseases Linked To Pesticides Report PDF
Wide Range of Diseases Linked to Pesticides
Further evidence there is a link between Parkinson’s and pesticides (Video)
Pesticide Use Linked to Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis
The harsh realities of pesticides and why this project is so important.

Click to read "Elephant In The Room" Section 9.10 by Project Founder Victor Alfieri


Why In Wayne NJ?
Wayne has exactly what insects search for in the constant need to breed and reproduce.
WATER and plenty of it. It's all around us. We live in the perfect breeding ground for insects.
Our existing environment provides the perfect condition for insect survival.

Flood lands, brooks, streams, small rivers, and lakes covering 27 square miles. With over 52,000 residents it would be hard to imagine the amount of free standing water in backyards, parks and things like tires, buckets, cans, birdbaths, rain gutters, plastic containers, wrappers, cups, soda cans, toys left outdoors, flower pots, and water-proof tarps.

If there was ever an urban town that would have an insect problem, Wayne NJ would be it.

Wayne NJ now has the opportunity to combat this problem with a proven method that has been used successfully for hundred's of years. This project will provide local residents with a free, organic, safe, and chemical free solution to the insect problem.

For every problem there is a solution. The problem is insects, the solution is bats.





Local Effort
The bats habitat has been ripped to shreds over the last 30 years and we are now paying the price. With bat populations dropping, the bats have become susceptible to disease and local populations are dropping dramatically. White-nose Syndrome has killed more than 5.7 million bats in Eastern North America since it was discovered in a single New York cave in February 2006.

Our bats need our help, locally. Unless we
take notice of this, we are going to lose this wonderful creature forever.  

Bats are essential to the health of our natural world. They help control pests and are vital pollinators and seed-dispersers for countless plants.

This creature needs to be understood,
tolerated, cared for, and studied, so locally

we can start making the changes needed to
help and increase our local bat population.

Before we can do this we first need to study and analyze data collected from our own local bats. To collect this data we must set up a research field and perform an experiment.

The data collected from this experiment will be very valuable to the bat community and in time will be referenced in bat conservation projects around the world. 

This experiment will help us determine the best suitable conditions for our local bats to thrive in. Knowing the preferred height, temperature, and sun exposure we can pin point the best spots for new bat house locations throughout our town.


Over the course of 3 seasons in 2013, spring, summer, and fall the data will be collected in real time from 18 strategically placed bat houses. Bat houses will be monitored from observation platforms daily by the local community and data will be collected.

Each bat house will be numbered and a field map will be provided. Bat house numbers
will be painted in white so each bat house can be identified from a distance in the
research field.

Project Implementation
The bat project will be split into two experiments A and B using two different bat house styles, in two different locations, creating two observation points. House's will be placed at different heights to try to pin point the most desired locations for bat inhabitants.

Finding The Best Location For The Project
Observation Research Field

Suggested location is Packanack Lake and Kilroy Park in Wayne New Jersey.

The project will include two bat conservation research fields spanning 1.18 miles located on both ends and directly over Packanack Lake.
From the highest north end of the park above the lake to the golf course south of Kilroy Field. See diagram below.



This location offers everything this project needs to be a success. Water, sun, open space, people, and insects. The streams and lake provide the perfect breeding ground for insects like mosquito's. 

With the lake's walking path, tennis courts, ball fields, golf course, swimming and fishing, this part of Wayne is used by a large number of Wayne residents in the spring, summer, and fall months.


Bat Houses Styles
For more than a decade, 7,000 research associates, volunteers, and colleagues collected and shared data from bat houses in varied climates and habitats across the continent. These findings have dramatically increased bat house success.

In these findings, there are 2 bat house designs that have stood out with the most success. Two Chamber Rocket Box and The Chamber Nursery. For this project, we will be using both bat house styles. This will increase our rate of success and help us understand what style works best in Wayne NJ
.

These designs are being used for this project because of their proven success in the field. US forestery service biologists have used these two designs throughout the country for the last 20 years with much success.

Click For Factors Influencing Bat House Occupancy Rate

Observation Field - A
Suggested Location:
Northern End Park, Packanack Lake
Park setting with plenty of parking,
and 3 existing points of access.

Surrounded by water
the northern
end of the lake provides the perfect
environment
for breeding insects and
hungry bats.

This experiment will include 1 - 6'x14'
observation platform and 9 Rocket
Box Bat Houses mounted on poles
in groups of 3 spread out over the
45,000 square foot park. Click For Factors Influencing Bat House Occupancy Rate

The Rocket Box
Rocket boxes were invented by U.S.
Forest Service biologist Dan Dourson
and John MacGregor in the early 1980's.

Rocket boxes have 2 chambers and are
over 3 feet
tall. They are designed to have 2 continuous
360° chambers.


The
chambers enable bats to travel within the confines of the
bat
house to choose the sunny or shaded side to find the most
optimal temperature for sleeping, breeding, and caring for their
young.

This bat house type stands alone on a single pole 20

to 40 feet in height with the bat house mounted on top.
These houses can be moved and relocated anytime.


With the park being over 800 feet long and over 150 feet wide
the houses can be placed in groups of three 200 feet apart in

different settings, sun exposure, and heights.

Diagram below shows rocket house placement example.




Project needs local volunteers to help build the bat houses. Click For Bat House Design Plans
Let me know you would like to help:   wbcp@woodlotfarms.com

Observation Field - B

Suggested Location:
Kilroy Field, Packanack Lake
South end of the lake, plenty of parking,

with 2 points of entry.

Walking distance of observation field A.
This field offers the perfect setting
for
this part of the bat
conservation project.
South of the lake and over looking the
golf course.


This experiment will include 1 - 6'x14' observation platform and 9 Chamber Nursery Bat House's.

Project will be using Kilroy field's existing
100 foot height field lighting poles. These poles
give this project many options for testing many different heights and sun exposures.
Click For Factors Influencing Bat House Occupancy Rate

Bat houses will be mounted on the poles at 3 different heights, in groups of 3.

See diagram below. With poles being at equal distance apart, the bat observation
grid will be formed and observed daily from the south end observation platform. 


Mounting and moving of bat houses will require town cherry picker or fire engine ladder.

Chamber Nursery
Click For Example

This bat nursery has been chosen because of the success in the field attracting bat populations. The greatest success in this style is with bat nursery's designed with 6 chambers or more.

These chambers encourage breeding. Nursery houses provide greater exposure for
solar heating and reduce the odds of overheating young bats.

The chambers enable the bats to move within the house to obtain optimal
temperatures for sleeping, breeding, and caring for young. This style of bat house can be moved and relocated anytime.

As you can see by the diagram below. 9 bat houses will be mounted at different heights on 3 existing light poles in full sun, facing the sun. The bat houses will be mounted with galvanized steel holding brackets with release pins for easy moving and maintenance.

Project needs local volunteers to help build the bat houses. Click For Bat House Design Plans

Let me know you would like to help:   wbcp@woodlotfarms.com


Click For Factors Influencing Bat House Occupancy Rate

Collecting The Data

Every day the project research fields will be monitored and data will be collected.
Each research field will have a platform for bat house observation. Platforms will be equipped with material for collecting real time, accurate data.

Local volunteers with follow a strict data collecting protocol. All collected data will 
be input into a program on a website to be analyzed in real time.

The first sighting of bat inhabitance is going to be very exciting. Local residents will flock to
the observation platforms for bat viewings. 

Counting just a few bats may involve nothing more than looking inside the bat house.
But for larger colonies, the only reasonably accurate method is to count them as they emerge at dusk to feed on insects.


To determine if you have a nursery colony, we will briefly look inside after the adults emerge.  Pups are always left behind at night for three to six weeks after birth, until they learn to fly.  Mothers usually give birth in June in moderate climates, April or May in the warmest areas and July in the coolest.


Observations of daily and seasonal movements within and between houses during both cool and hot periods will provide knowledge about how to best help your local bats.
This project will help us determine the best suitable conditions for our local bats to thrive in. Knowing the preferred height, temperature, and sun exposure we can pin point the best spots for new bat house locations throughout our town.

The data collected from this project will be very valuable to the bat community and referenced
in bat conservation projects around the world. 


 
"We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors,
we borrow it from our Children."

Ancient Indian Proverb
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Estimated Project Cost
This project is about conservation, health, and community. All labor will be volunteer and preformed by Wayne NJ residents. Project will need up to 100 dedicated local residents of all ages for project planning, setup, data collecting, and analysis.

Who pays For This?

We all are, food allergies, eczema, asthma, autism, learning disabilities, birth defects, reproductive dysfunction, diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, ADHD, and many types of cancer. Learn More: http://www.woodlotfarms.com/Section_9.html

Monetarily: Tax dollars or donations. Whichever comes first. But, it all comes down to whether Wayne residents want to start moving in a healthier more sustainable direction. But this is not my decision. I'm going to present the facts, try to get the message out, and see what happens.

Spraying chemicals costs money, it has very little impact, and it is not healthy for us.
This project will lead to saving tax dollars.


Sustainable Wayne WE NEED YOUR HELP!
This conservation bat project counts towards our local efforts to get Wayne NJ certified points
for "Sustainable Jersey" and will enable our town to apply for state grants that will further our local health and sustainable efforts.


If you would be interested in donating time or money to support this project please contact.
Victor Alfieri, project founder e-mail @ editor@woodlotfarms.com or call 201-220-4862

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HELP NEEDED
Local Bat's Need Your Help.
Become a part of the WBCP.
Sign Up
Today!

Name:
City or Town:
Phone:
Email Address:
Comments:

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Common Local Bat
Brown Bat

Eptesicus fuscus


The most common bats in Wayne NJ
  are the Little and Big Brown Bat.

Most of the US and Canada except for extreme southern Florida ends South of Central Texas inhabit the Brown Bat.




Flying insect killers
with 52.5 million years of experience.
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Social Species
 Bats live in colonies. Colonies can
range between a few to 1000’s of bats.
Depending on the species.

The average colony is about 10-15 bats.


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White-nose
Syndrome

has devastated bat populations across the eastern United States during the past five years, causing “the most precipitous wildlife decline in the past century in North America,” according to biologists. And this relentless disease keeps spreading into new areas. BCI is working with agencies, organizations and individuals to understand and stop WNS and begin restoring these decimated bat populations.

White-nose Syndrome has killed more than a million bats since it was discovered in a single New York cave in February 2006. Nine bat species in 19 U.S. states and 4 Canadian provinces have now been documented with
either WNS or the fungus, Geomyces destructans, that is the demonstrated cause
of this devastating disease.

Named for a cold-loving white fungus typically found on the faces and wings of infected bats, White-nose Syndrome causes bats to awaken more often during hibernation and use up the stored fat reserves that are needed to get them through the winter. Infected bats often emerge too soon from hibernation and are often seen flying around in midwinter. These bats usually freeze or starve to death.

Mortality rates approaching 100 percent are reported at some sites. White-nose Syndrome threatens some of the largest hibernation caves for endangered Indiana myotis, gray myotis,
and Virginia big-eared bats. Ultimately, bats across North America are at imminent risk.

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HELP NEEDED
Local Bat's Need Your Help.
Become a part of the WBCP.
Sign Up
Today!

Name:
City or Town:
Phone:
Email Address:
Comments:

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Dr. A.R. Campbell, M.D.
Dr. A.R. Campbell was a Texas doctor
who discovered that smallpox was only spread by the bite of the bloodsucking insects. Dr. Campbell proved that smallpox is not contagious and is not
an airborne disease.



Dr. Campbell discovered how to
colonize bats in order to destroy the malaria carrying mosquito.

Dr. Campbell was the head
Bacteriologist for the city of San Antonio, Texas. His work on eradicating the malaria causing mosquito led him to construct a BAT HOUSE and colonize bats as you would bees.

For his great discovery, he was
nominated for the Noble Prize
for Medicine by the State of
Texas on Feb. 10,1919.


Dr. Campbell standing in
front of his Bat House.


Click To Read More
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Bat Fast Facts
Size:
Bats are divided into two suborders: Megachiroptera, meaning large bat, and Microchiroptera, meaning small bat. The largest
bats have a 6 foot wingspan. The bodies of the smallest bats are no more than an inch long.

Lifespan:
Most bats live longer than most
mammals of their size. The longest known
lifespan of a bat in the wild is 30 years for a
little brown bat.
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HELP NEEDED
Local Bat's Need Your Help.
Become a part of the WBCP.
Sign Up
Today!

Name:
City or Town:
Phone:
Email Address:
Comments:

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Observation Field - B
Pole Mount Example

Existing Kilroy Field Poles
Ball Field Lighting




Inhabited 7 Chamber Nursery

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“It is unfortunate that the average person has
a deep prejudice against the bat. Without looking or thinking for himself, he accepts a lot of absurd tales about the winged one, and passes them
on and on, never caring for the injustice he does
or the pleasure he loses.  I have loved the bat
ever since I came to know him; that is, all my mature life.  He is the climax of creation in many things, highly developed in brain, marvelously
keen in senses, clad in exquisite fur and
equipped, above all, with the crowning glory
of flight.  He is the prototype and the realization
of the Fairy of the Wood we loved so much as children, and so hated to be robbed of by grown-ups, who should have known better. 

I would give a good deal to have a bat colony
where I could see it daily, and would go a long
way to meet some new kind of bat.”  


Ernest Thompson Seton
One of the founders of the Boy Scouts of America, and Chief Scout from 1915-1934. He co-authored the first Boy Scout Handbook.

www.batcon.org
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